This website is misleading!

I built my website to help me reach my audience — for speaking, coaching, and writing. I hope the site conveys that.

Here’s the thing: I’m not doing that any more.

I have surrendered wanting to be a professional speaker. Having valuable information to share is absolutely no assurance of success.

I am not pursuing coaching clients, and for today, would probably not take one on.

Check the date stamps on my blog, and you can see how much I’ve been writing.

So why does my website still say that stuff?

I don't have a nutrition credential. Doesn't seem like that's very valuable, anyway.

Up to now, it would be wrong to describe this as sparring, because you have to have a partner for that. In the recent past, I’ve been opining, and someone whom I’ll keep nameless has been vehemently dismissing my perspective. Not just disagreeing, but dissing, and responding to claims I don't make and beliefs I don't hold.

OK, sure, it’s just another moment in social media.

But his last couple of comments have been worming into my serenity, until I decided today to address them. But I’m not just talking to him.

Out of relapse, for today

I don't want to be blogging right now, but I realize that I need to update the previous post, about my being in relapse, 'cause for today anyway, I'm not anymore. I can't have such a dangerously misleading headline being what readers see first.

For 46 days, I've been abstaining from foods and food behaviors that are unhealthy for me. In early December, I went away to Acorn Food Dependency Recovery Services, a Florida-based group from which I've sought help for more than 20 years, and I've been better since.

I am in relapse

I’m writing it anyway, but I fear that this post will be a blog cliche: Writer posts often for a while, even a long while, but then fades away. Then she/he writes again, saying “I’ve been gone, but XXX happened, and now I’m back.”

I frickin’ hate being a cliche, almost enough to not even write this. But, here I am, albeit without any promise that I’ll ever write after this. But like every writer ever, I have something I think I should contribute.

And yet, I remain committed to what *I* can change

This is a reply to Dr. Jon Robison, with whom I occasionally spar gently on the LinkedIn platform. I began it as a comment on the platform, but it said I’d exceeded the allowable character count.

The conversation began over a post I shared about a sugary-soda tax being implemented in Catalonia, Spain. His most recent comment was …

Being obese sucks

... and I just don't know why anyone would defend a person's right to be live obesely.

This *isn't* me saying that obese people are bad. This is me saying I was obese, and there was nothing good about it. N-o-t-h-i-n-g-!

Even a quarter century later, I'm glad I'm not obese, and I'm willing to work against a return to it. It is easily(!) worth doing, and pays rewards every single day. 

Superior explanation of a complicated subject

This may seem pretty random, but I point you toward this post for a couple of reasons. 

First, it is, to me, a superior example of explaining esoteric math in a fashion that nonscientists can understand. It is very hard — I never really know how incomplete my knowledge is until I have to explain it to readers making no claim on that knowledge. IMO, George Dallas shows how well he knows his subject.

"10 Words or Less" with Shawna Pelton

Shawna Pelton is a metaphysical healer and transformational coach who came to her work, as many in the helping professions do, out of the crucible of hardship. She’s a widowed single mom, whose partner died from addiction. Her training is incredibly diverse, ranging from the Global College of Natural Medicine to the Divine Living Academy. I found her to be a lovely, ambitious person eager to help others.


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