obesity

"Fed Up": Maybe Michelle can lead once she's relieved from power

One of the interesting subplots of “Fed Up,” the “Inconvenient Truth” for food led by Laurie David, Katie Couric, and director Stephanie Soechtig, is how Michelle Obama is handled.

By those not paying close attention, she is regarded as the Obesity First Lady (hold your guns, there Michelle, that’s very different from the “obese First Lady,” which I Did. Not. Say.), promoter of fresh garden food and protector of young children.

But she only started out that way, for just a few months, before being reined in by the commercial juggernaut.


Hey, I know that guy!

Maybe this post has a valid point, or maybe it’s just dressed up to avoid outright braggartry. You decide.

I attended the Boston premiere of the new food documentary “Fed Up” Wednesday, and I was struck by how many of the experts quoted in the film that I’ve had personal contact with:

* Rob Lustig, perhaps the most quoted voice? Sat next to him at the Commonwealth Club of California a couple of years ago, on a panel I originated.


"Fed Up": The forces that make us fat

I saw the new documentary “Fed Up” in a special showing at the Harvard School for Public Health in Boston Wednesday, and it was as though my life passed before my eyes.

Among the film’s techniques was to give Flip cameras to 13 teens who live with persistent, significant overweight, and I can only hope I would have been as articulate, perceptive, and emotionally present as some of these kids were.


Food-manufacturer responsibility: "It is not zero."

I do not have permission to post the following, and if the author, Paul McDonald — a lawyer, no less — wants me to take it down, I will. But I'm entirely in agreement with his views, and want to extend their reach by whatever small measure I can provide. This article was published on politico.com (maybe they'll object, too?), and I saw it via Michele Simon, a public-interest advocate I admire.

Opinion: Big Food bears some responsibility


"It’s unlikely for it to be one disease, and to have one cure for everyone"

The hits keep coming on “10 Words or Less,” the feature in which I ask brief questions of interesting people and request brief answers in return. Today’s participant is one of the foremost living experts on addiction. He is a Distinguished Alumni Professor and the Donald Dizney chair of the Department of Psychiatry in the University of Florida College of Medicine. Before we proceed, here’s the usual “10 Words” disclaimer: "Ten words" is an ethic, not a limit, so please, no counting.


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