Boston Globe

TO FIND NEW MUSIC, START SCROBBLING

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If even one commercial music station were better than warm spit, I might have been in the position to hear the Eels and Vertical Horizon, two of my new favorite bands, when they started out in the '90s.

But because radio stations all play the same 10 songs or are as
stuck in the past as my music collection used to be, I never listen to
them. For a long time, that meant if a pal didn't turn me on to new
music, my collection stood still.

But now I have Audioscrobbler.com, and I am loving it.


THE ORGANIC MAN DELIVERS

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A few years ago, several large corporations thought they sniffed
profits through Internet ordering and home delivery of groceries, but
most of them failed fairly quickly. That might have been because
consumers didn't consider the convenience worth the cost, although
Peapod, a corporate affiliate of Stop &Shop, still survives despite
a minimum delivery order of $50 and a minimum delivery charge of $4.95.


NEW iPODS NOT NECESSARILY IMPROVED

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The 15-gigabyte iPod introduced April 28 with a couple of cousins,
one bigger and one smaller, is impressive. It can hold and play back
thousands of songs, can perform somewhat like my Palm Pilot, is
formattable for either PCs or Macs, and is impossibly sleek and light.

I would probably want to run out and get myself one, if not for one
thing: I have a 10-gigabyte model from the line's first generation, and
it's better. After 10 days testing an Apple Corp. loaner, I can only
vouch for the first half of that American ideal, "new and improved."


REFLECTIONS OF THE NEW MASTERS

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With graduation season comes a new wave of art-school graduates,
their Masters of Fine Arts degrees conferred by Massachusetts College
of Art, Boston University, and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts.
What do you learn in such programs, and when you are done, what comes
next?

JASON CHASE
Boston University

Age: 25

Born: Colorado Springs

Resides: Somerville


THE HOUSE TALKS Realtors take condo sales pitch to the (very local) airwaves

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To millions of New York City commuters, 1010 AM means WINS radio,
where they say, "You give us 22 minutes, we'll give you the world."

But the slogan for 1010 AM on a tree-lined block in Brookline, if
they had one, would be more like, "You give us until the traffic signal
at Beacon Street changes, we'll tell you about this condominium for
sale."


EXPLOITING THE NETWORK Entertainment, games, and plenty more are being passed around the most connected households

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You probably know a family that has established a network at home to connect all its computers. Each person in the house probably uses the network to share broadband internet access, the printer maybe, or a few files.

What's far less likely is that you have friends who are
using their networks to share entertainment: music, photographs, shows
recorded from television, games, movies, and more.


AIMEE MANN GETS HELP FROM A FRIEND

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For years, Aimee Mann's sweet voice and her dark and brilliant lyrics have obscured the opportunities for strong electric guitar play in her music. On Tuesday night at Avalon, those opportunities fully flowered under the fingers of sideman Julian Coryell.

From a thrilling, reverberating, show-ending solo on "Long Shot" that was not deterred by his breaking a string to the subtle slide atmosphere he created for "Voices Carry," the 'Til Tuesday tune that Mann selected for her second encore, Coryell was the story of the evening.


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