Travel

A TRUE SPECTACLE, SEEN AT THE SOURCE Big-city fireworks in a small town

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JAFFREY, N.H. - For 364 days a year, the high point in Jaffrey is Mount Monadnock, 3,165 feet tall and considered the second-most-climbed mountain in the world.

But on a latter Saturday in August every year, Monadnock is eclipsed.
 
That's the day of Jaffrey's Festival of Fireworks, when the ground shakes, the sky explodes, and the town's population bursts from its usual census of about 5,400 to more than 40,000.


ALTITUDE TV Song Airlines' in-flight video goes way beyond the movies

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Airlines have long tried to mask the undeniable fact that to travel,
you have to leave home. Back in the '30s, for example, when Pan Am's
China Clipper began overseas service, it offered dining on fine china
and had beds.

Analogues of those amenities - hot food, blankets, and pillows for
all - eventually made it into coach. Other amenities were examples of
trying to make flying even better than home: movies, magazines, and
service at your seat.


OF SALT AND THE EARTH In a land of kings, these relics are awesome

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PETRA, JORDAN — A downside to visiting any of the world's A-list travel sites is
that they are not so much virgin experiences as they are comparisons
with what you learned in school, with photographs you have seen, or
with tales cousin Jerry told from his summer vacation.

At the other end of the spectrum, you could call it the Z list, are
a million places you have never heard of because there is no reason to
go.


GIBRALTAR'S PROFILE STILL A SIGHT TO BEHOLD

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GIBRALTAR - Driving down the AP-7, the toll version of the highway
that follows Spain's Costa del Sol, we saw it shrouded in haze about 20
miles out, but there could be no doubt: This was Gibraltar, and it is
one big rock.

It's not only size that makes the impression. Even in the hilly
topography of Andalusia, the rock bursts so abruptly upward from the
bottom of Europe that it is easy to see why the ancients called it one
of the Pillars of Hercules, placed there to mark the edge of the known
world.


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