Music

LOS LOBOS SURVIVE, AND THRIVE

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"How Will the Wolf Survive?" was the title question of Los Lobos's debut album, and the answer is more a wonder today than ever. From mere distractions to personal tragedy - none worse than the murder of guitarist and vocalist Cesar Rosas's wife - events have threatened to put the band asunder. But their new release, "Good Morning Aztlan," proves they not only survived, but continue to thrive. The strong point of this new effort is Louie Perez's lyrics, many of which come from mourning, even if they don't end there.


GUITAR LOVERS' SECRET WORD: D'GARY

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It used to be that one sure way to check guitar lovers' bona fides was to ask their favorites. If Michael Hedges or Ry Cooder wasn't on the list, you had cause for doubt. Now here's another secret password for the devotees' club: D'Gary (given name: Ernest Randrianasolo), the acoustic maestro from Madagascar. He's not new: Two critics in these pages picked his "Horombe" disc as among the best of 1995, and a couple of years later, "Mbo Loza" arrived with similar satisfaction. Now comes "Akata Meso," which is both the same and different.


MONTOYA RETURNS

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Coco Montoya has reserved a spot for his mentor and musical father, Albert Collins, on each of his five albums. In 1995, it was Collins's "Gotta Mind To Travel," and the result was one of its hottest tracks.

On the new "Can't Look Back," it happens again: Montoya blisters through Collins's "Same Old Thing," stretching out in a way he chooses not to with most of his own compositions.

Montoya also likes to put some soul into his mix. This time, he takes a run through "Something About You," the Dozier/Holland/Dozier tune popularized by the Four Tops in 1965.


U2'S SEARING SHOW IS A TIME TO HEAL

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PROVIDENCE - The typical U2 concert, if such events could ever be called typical, is made up of equal parts of love and politics, showmanship and musicianship, Bono and the Edge.

At the Big Donut in Providence Tuesday night, the band added a heavy helping of good old American patriotism, egged on by the lead singer's numerous allusions to the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11.


USING EMOTION AND INTUITION, VIOLINIST EVOKES HIS OWN IDEAL WORLD

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There's no veneer to Jean-Luc Ponty, the jazz violinist who's appearing at Berklee Performance Center Thursday night.

You might expect, and could forgive, a little crustiness if you consider his path: decades of performing, thousands of concerts, hundreds of venues, and dozens of tours in countries uncounted. After classical training and a symphony job right after, he helped shape the futures of rock and jazz during stints with Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention and John McLaughlin's Mahavishnu Orchestra. He's been a successful bandleader and composer for more than 25 years.


THE GREAT UNKNOWN Malian musician Habib Koite samples his country’s traditions and cultures

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NEW YORK - Oh, you jaded listener. You don't know the name Habib Koite, and you want to know why you should care about one more musician from someplace you've barely heard of. Well, maybe this will put him on your musical map:

On the opening night last month of his 37-city march across North America, fans repeatedly threw money – $10s and $20s, real money - at his feet or, better yet, pasted the bills onto his brow, moist with the sweat of his labor.

Battle that, Eminem.


BORN TO THE BLUES Coco Montoya learned what he wanted — with both kinds of luck

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In 48 years on the planet, Coco Montoya has been lucky, good, and to the brink of death, three of the many reasons to think he was born to play the blues.

Lucky: Barely 21 and a drummer in a California bar band, Montoya left his kit at the club one night after a gig. The next day, blues guitar legend Albert Collins came to play a matinee, and the club manager let him use the drums. When Montoya came by later and saw that someone had been playing in his seat, he let the manager know he didn't like it. Word got to Collins, who called to apologize, and a deep lifelong friendship was born.


TO THE BEAT OF HER CONVICTIONS Singer Angelique Kidjo a dynamic force for peace, spirituality

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NEW ORLEANS - To get a clue into Angelique Kidjo, you only had to witness her set at Congo Square, one of the big venues of this city's annual Jazz and Heritage Festival, on the first Friday in May.

It wasn't just that she wheedled the burly security chief until he allowed fans to come up and join her. Kidjo commonly requires fans at her shows not only to dance, as she does endlessly, but to do so with her onstage.


ATTUNED Apple users find new iTunes site hard to resist

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Joshua Weisbuch, 33, of Jamaica Plain says he's visited the iTunes
Music Store about 30 times since it opened less than three weeks ago.

Peter Wood, 24, of Beverly says he's gone at least once a day.

Barbara Mende, a grandmother from Waltham, says she's been only
three times. "I'm staying away from it," she says. "It's addictive."


TO FIND NEW MUSIC, START SCROBBLING

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If even one commercial music station were better than warm spit, I might have been in the position to hear the Eels and Vertical Horizon, two of my new favorite bands, when they started out in the '90s.

But because radio stations all play the same 10 songs or are as
stuck in the past as my music collection used to be, I never listen to
them. For a long time, that meant if a pal didn't turn me on to new
music, my collection stood still.

But now I have Audioscrobbler.com, and I am loving it.


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