S U S T A I N A B L Y

Not everything has to make sense

This is the sixth in a series of eight posts detailing concepts and attitudes for sustainable personal change. As one would expect of someone maintaining a 155-pound loss for more than 20 years, my examples have to do with food and weight, but their point is to illustrate how anyone can achieve and maintain healthy change. Today’s concept:  “Not everything has to make sense.”

Working together isn't enough

This is the fifth in a series of eight posts detailing concepts and attitudes for sustainable personal change. As one would expect of someone maintaining a 155-pound loss for more than 20 years, my examples have to do with food and weight, but their point is to illustrate how anyone can achieve and maintain healthy change. Today’s concept:  “Working together isn’t enough.”

Working together is a selfish act

This is the fourth in a series of eight posts detailing concepts and attitudes for sustainable personal change. As one would expect of someone maintaining a 155-pound loss for more than 20 years, my examples have to do with food and weight, but their point is to illustrate how anyone can achieve and maintain healthy change. Today’s concept:  “Working together is a selfish act.”

Everything each person does has an impact, personal and planetary

This is the third in a series of eight posts detailing concepts and attitudes for sustainable personal change. As one would expect of someone maintaining a 155-pound loss for more than 20 years, my examples have to do with food and weight, but their point is to illustrate how anyone can achieve and maintain healthy change. Today’s concept: “It matters.”

Let’s start with the obvious question: “It?” And by it, I mean “everything.” Not in an anal-retentive way, not in a self-involved way, but what I do matters. 

It's never just one thing

This is the second in a series of eight posts detailing concepts and attitudes for sustainable personal change. As one would expect of someone maintaining a 155-pound loss for more than 20 years, my examples have to do with food and weight, but their point is to provide both concepts and practical steps anyone can take to achieve and maintain healthy change. Today’s concept: “It’s never one thing.”

It's all one thing

This is the first in a series of eight posts detailing concepts and attitudes for sustainable personal change. As one would expect of someone maintaining a 155-pound loss for more than 20 years, my examples have to do with food and weight, but their point is to provide concepts and their practical outgrowths to help anyone achieve and maintain healthy change. Today’s concept: “It’s all one thing.”

Over the past 10 years or so, I have involved myself in two discussions professionally: causes and remedies of obesity, and saving the planet from global climate change.

A flurry of speaking opportunities

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I have begun a very busy speaking schedule that I hope I can sustain:

* Yesterday, I spoke to an undergrad class in the Lynch School of Education at Boston College.
* Sunday, I'm speaking to two services (9 and 11) of the West Hartford (Conn.) Unitarian-Universalist Church.
* Monday and Tuesday, I'm participating in several activities at Phillips Exeter in Exeter, N.H. The highlight for me will be addressing the 900-student body Tuesday morning, by far my largest audience.
* A week from Sunday, I'll be visiting the Brookfield (Mass.) Unitarian-Universalist Church.

Sustainable You

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I sent out yesterday the first edition of "Sustainable You," a newsletter I hope to post about once a month. In addition to keeping readers abreast of my speaking gigs, I'll be using it to lay out the principles of sustainable personal change, as I've defined them via the experience of keeping 155 pounds off my body for more than 20 years. I'm sure I'll find other interesting things to talk about as well.

"Yeah, man, we're still here!"

Early in my days as a reporter, I remember reaching a frustration point in my writing a few times and just typing some trash (not unfactual, just unartful), thinking, "no one will see it." As if, very soon after I filed, they weren't going to print 18,000 copies of it.

I felt a vestige of that a couple of times in the past week — you mean, anyone sees this thing after I hit "save"?— when readers of this blog asked me if there was something wrong with its RSS feed, or me, since I'd sent nothing out in a while. (Until yesterday morning, it had been since Dec. 10.)

"Oh my God, we're all gonna die!"

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I’m sure I’m not the only person who has fantasized about how I would react in a moment of crisis — rush into the burning building, shove the unsuspecting child away from the onrushing car, change the channel before the cliffhanger is spoiled.

I suspect I’m in a smaller cohort who wonders how I’d really react — split-second action or soiled drawers.

I reflect on those this morning because I’ve been wanting to write about dying, and no matter what opinions I espouse, I have no idea how I will react when my time comes. OK, so I’ve acknowledged that.

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